Swarm!

Eat (vegan). Ride (fast). Destroy (dominant culture).

3 notes

We have a public health crisis in these neighborhoods, and it starts on the streets. That’s where I would start the conversation. The biggest predictor of fatalities on a street is speed, and the biggest factor in speed on your street is design.
Los Angeles Department of Transportation (LADOT) General Manager Seleta Reynolds, interview published at Streetsblog L.A. today. (via lastreetsblog)

12,229 notes

thisradicalchange:


We didn’t know that our activism and our peaceful displays would result in guns literally looking down our eyes. Literally looking down our eyes. Guns.
And I had young people who were willing to die. For justice. 
I had a young person — and he’s definitely the example of many young people that I represent who said "I didn’t think I would make it to twenty-one years old so I’m ready to die now. Let’s do it now."

State senator Maria Chappelle-Nadal (@MariaChappelleN) speaks on the Senate floor about the events she witnessed in Ferguson, Missouri in the weeks following the execution of Mike Brown. Senator Chappelle-Nadal was one of many protesters tear gassed for three hours without reprieve by the Ferguson PD.
She has been consistent and unrelenting in her criticism of Governor Jay Nixon — to the point of tweeting him “FUCK you, Governor!” — for his lack of action over the violation of citizens’ constitutional right to peacefully protest, and passionately vocal about the violent ways in which protesters were abused by the police.
Full video of Senator Chappelle-Nadal’s speech is available for download here (.wmv format). 

thisradicalchange:

We didn’t know that our activism and our peaceful displays would result in guns literally looking down our eyes. Literally looking down our eyes. Guns.

And I had young people who were willing to die. For justice.

I had a young person — and he’s definitely the example of many young people that I represent who said "I didn’t think I would make it to twenty-one years old so I’m ready to die now. Let’s do it now."

State senator Maria Chappelle-Nadal (@MariaChappelleN) speaks on the Senate floor about the events she witnessed in Ferguson, Missouri in the weeks following the execution of Mike Brown. Senator Chappelle-Nadal was one of many protesters tear gassed for three hours without reprieve by the Ferguson PD.

She has been consistent and unrelenting in her criticism of Governor Jay Nixonto the point of tweeting him “FUCK you, Governor!” — for his lack of action over the violation of citizens’ constitutional right to peacefully protest, and passionately vocal about the violent ways in which protesters were abused by the police.

Full video of Senator Chappelle-Nadal’s speech is available for download here (.wmv format). 

(via thisiswhiteprivilege)

10,979 notes

18mr:

Fast food workers struggling for a wage of $15 an hour and the right to unionize participated in a nonviolent civil disobedience action last week. 

This is Emily Nguyen (ponytail) and Kalia Vang (visor). Emily is 20 years-old and a sophomore at Sacramento City College. She’s worked in fast food for a year and a half and makes California minimum wage ($9 an hour). She says, “I’m just working to breathe, to stay alive. I’m not really living life. We won’t stop till we meet our destination, till our wages go up.”

 Watch the emotional video of their arrest here, and be sure to support them on Facebook here!

(via thisiswhiteprivilege)

15 notes

compassionco:

Our latest featured organization is Food Empowerment Project. If you didn’t know, we donate 5% of every sale to organizations that further the cause of animal liberation. FEP is amazing and will be receiving this 5% donation until the end of the year. If you are unfamiliar with their vital intersectional work, please visit FoodIsPower.org (at The Compassion Cave)

compassionco:

Our latest featured organization is Food Empowerment Project. If you didn’t know, we donate 5% of every sale to organizations that further the cause of animal liberation. FEP is amazing and will be receiving this 5% donation until the end of the year. If you are unfamiliar with their vital intersectional work, please visit FoodIsPower.org (at The Compassion Cave)

(via thebunnyalliance)

64 notes

Share the new anti-dairy BART ads, you could win awesome vegan prizes!

vegansaurus:

imageAs you may have heard, the Factory Farming Awareness Coalition won free ad space on BART for the third year in a row! Congrats, you guys! In part thanks to many of our readers voting I’m sure. Well, the ads have launched! And they are already getting some nice coverage

This year, I actually helped with the ad concepting and copy a bit. FFAC wanted to target dairy, including an ad taking aim at the role of dairy in the CA drought. They were inspired by this Mother Jones post showing just how much water goes into various dairy products. The shower idea came because, like us vegans continue to lament, it’s ridiculous how the water conservation agenda focuses so much attention on things like turning the water off when you brush your teeth or watering your lawn at dawn but they neglect to inform people about the impact of meat and dairy on the water supply. Meanwhile, avoiding those products would make a HUGE impact in water conservation. Not that the other suggestions aren’t good, but they are so minor compared to resource-suck that is animal agriculture.

imageHere’s the other ad, a gentle alert to the fact that dairy cows have to have babies to produce milk—and those babies aren’t hanging out with mom if people are drinking the milk. It doesn’t go all the way to the veal industry relationship but just connecting the dots for people about mammals…milk…babies…is important. I have conversations all the time with non-vegans who are completely unaware that dairy cows don’t just constantly produce milk without being impregnated. Actually, if we’re being honest, I didn’t really know that before I started looking into veganism. I mean if you think about it, it’s like duh, but we are just so distanced from food sources that people don’t even think about the logistics of it all. 

However! It’s not all doom and gloom in this post! FFAC wanted me to inform you that they are holding a little Instagram contest for the ads and the prizes are SO EXCITING! There’s a contest for each ad. It doesn’t appear that you need to post an actual photo of the ad in the station, but just the ad itself. You do HAVE to follow @ffacoalition's IG account though. More details:

Drought Ad: From now until September 19th, post the Drought ad on your Instagram account, tag @ffacoalition and hashtag it with #ffaconbart, and you could win a three-month subscription to either the Vegan Cuts Beauty Box OR the Vegan Cuts Snack Box! Winner’s choice!

Calf Ad: Starting September 21st and ending October 5th, post a pic of the calf ad on your IG account, again tagging @ffacoalition and hashtagging #ffaconbart. For this one, you could win a $50.00 gift certificate to Vegan Essentials! That’s ONLY my FAVORITE store EVER. 

The super official rules are here but that’s the basic need-to-know. Nice prizes, right?!

Has anyone seen the ads irl? TAKE A PICTURE FOR ME! I want to see it “in situ” as us ad folk say. I’ll be your best friend!

532 notes

nativenews:

Natives decolonize diet to fight diabetes, reconnect to land
[PHOTO: Rebecca Yoshino, director of the Shakopee Mdewakanton’s gardens, holds Dakota Corn in her hands Aug. 19, 2014 in Shakopee, Minn. American Indians are tackling obesity and diabetes by embracing ancient foods. Kyndell Harkness/Minneapolis Star Tribune/MCT.]
Bit by bit, the farm at Little Earth of United Tribes is growing. So, too, is a movement among Native Americans across the nation to improve their health by rediscovering ancestral foods and connections to lands once lost.
“It’s growing in the last 10 years within the Native communities in the United States,” said Susen Fagrelius, coordinator of Little Earth’s community health initiatives. As more people realize they can grow a significant amount of vegetables on a small parcel of land, they discover that “they have the ability to take back their food system.”
Lakota sage appears where once ordinary grass grew. Rows of Oneida cornstalks tower 6 feet in the air. Raspberries cover a small patch of the farm.
When Indians were forced onto reservations, government commodities replaced the unprocessed, nutrient-rich foods they were used to eating, said Mihesuah, a member of the Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma who runs the American Indian Health and Diet Project at the University of Kansas.
“Type 2 diabetes didn’t start showing up until after the Civil War,” she said. Through food, she wanted to “help our community and other native communities address acute and chronic conditions.”
The decolonized diet movement is spreading seeds nationwide. In New Mexico, indigenous food programs are working to preserve seeds from hundreds of years ago. Tribes in North Carolina are restoring native fruit and vegetable plants in newly established gardens.
The Shakopee Mdewakanton Sioux Community is at the forefront of these efforts. Lori Watso, a former public health nurse and Shakopee Tribe member, was the inspiration for the expansive garden and natural health store established on tribal land in Prior Lake, Minnesota.
Since starting in 2010, the garden has more than doubled in size.
Now in its fifth growing season, the 12-acre Wozupi has an orchard with trees bearing indigenous fruits – June berries, elderberries and wild plums. Goats and chickens roam the newly added Children’s Garden. There’s also a Heritage Garden, where ancient seeds given to them from other tribes grow.

nativenews:

Natives decolonize diet to fight diabetes, reconnect to land

[PHOTO: Rebecca Yoshino, director of the Shakopee Mdewakanton’s gardens, holds Dakota Corn in her hands Aug. 19, 2014 in Shakopee, Minn. American Indians are tackling obesity and diabetes by embracing ancient foods. Kyndell Harkness/Minneapolis Star Tribune/MCT.]

Bit by bit, the farm at Little Earth of United Tribes is growing. So, too, is a movement among Native Americans across the nation to improve their health by rediscovering ancestral foods and connections to lands once lost.

“It’s growing in the last 10 years within the Native communities in the United States,” said Susen Fagrelius, coordinator of Little Earth’s community health initiatives. As more people realize they can grow a significant amount of vegetables on a small parcel of land, they discover that “they have the ability to take back their food system.”

Lakota sage appears where once ordinary grass grew. Rows of Oneida cornstalks tower 6 feet in the air. Raspberries cover a small patch of the farm.

When Indians were forced onto reservations, government commodities replaced the unprocessed, nutrient-rich foods they were used to eating, said Mihesuah, a member of the Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma who runs the American Indian Health and Diet Project at the University of Kansas.

“Type 2 diabetes didn’t start showing up until after the Civil War,” she said. Through food, she wanted to “help our community and other native communities address acute and chronic conditions.”

The decolonized diet movement is spreading seeds nationwide. In New Mexico, indigenous food programs are working to preserve seeds from hundreds of years ago. Tribes in North Carolina are restoring native fruit and vegetable plants in newly established gardens.

The Shakopee Mdewakanton Sioux Community is at the forefront of these efforts. Lori Watso, a former public health nurse and Shakopee Tribe member, was the inspiration for the expansive garden and natural health store established on tribal land in Prior Lake, Minnesota.

Since starting in 2010, the garden has more than doubled in size.

Now in its fifth growing season, the 12-acre Wozupi has an orchard with trees bearing indigenous fruits – June berries, elderberries and wild plums. Goats and chickens roam the newly added Children’s Garden. There’s also a Heritage Garden, where ancient seeds given to them from other tribes grow.

(via thisiswhiteprivilege)

31,942 notes

Suddenly her mom’s silence matched Jackie’s own. “Oh, my God,” she murmured in disbelief. “Are you gay?”

"Yeah," Jackie forced herself to say.

After what felt like an eternity, her mom finally responded. “I don’t know what we could have done for God to have given us a fag as a child,” she said before hanging up.

[…]

She got a call from her older brother. “He said, ‘Mom and Dad don’t want to talk to you, but I’m supposed to tell you what’s going to happen,’” Jackie recalls. “And he’s like, ‘All your cards are going to be shut off, and Mom and Dad want you to take the car and drop it off at this specific location. Your phone’s going to last for this much longer. They don’t want you coming to the house, and you’re not to contact them. You’re not going to get any money from them. Nothing. And if you don’t return the car, they’re going to report it stolen.’ And I’m just bawling. I hung up on him because I couldn’t handle it.” Her brother was so firm, so matter-of-fact, it was as if they already weren’t family.

You should read this Rolling Stones piece on Queer kids getting kicked out by their religious parents. And remember it.  (via fuckyeahdiomedes)

(Source: feministbatwoman, via thisiswhiteprivilege)

3 notes

lastreetsblog:

L.A.’s only left-turn-only bike lane? Bicycling east on Chandler Blvd approaching Vineland Avenue (between the Burbank-Chandler bike path and the NoHo Metro Red Line Station.)

lastreetsblog:

L.A.’s only left-turn-only bike lane? Bicycling east on Chandler Blvd approaching Vineland Avenue (between the Burbank-Chandler bike path and the NoHo Metro Red Line Station.)

737 notes

alloftheveganfood:

Vegan Sausage Round Up

Simple Italian Sausages

Vegan Sausage Hot Dog with Slaw & Beetroot Chutney

Homemade Sundried Tomato & Pine Nut Seitan Sausages with Soft Polenta & Pan Roasted Tomato Sauce

Sausage Rolls with a Trio of Dipping Sauces

Beetballs (GF/SF)

Carrot Potato Soup with Vegan Sausage

Homemade Vegan Sausage & Cheese Calzones

Oven Baked Fried Rice with Vegan Sausage

Spicy Vegan Sausage Jambalaya

Vegan Sausage French Toast Breakfast Sandwich (GF)